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Globalization has made our world borderless.
It is very obvious in the whole aspect of life such as social, culture and so on.
There are ties among the nations.
For those who would like getting around Bali with us
This is your chance to get out and surrounding the bali island. A very relaxing way to see the sights
organized tours relieve you of the hassle of trying to navigate your way arround.
On the down side, however, you do have to follow itineraries,




BALI ISLAND



Besakih temple at karangasem bali
Besakih temple at karangasem bali
Bukit jambul at karangasem bali
Besakih Temple Besakih Temple Bukit Jambul
Surfing at kuta beach
Sunset in uluwatu Bali
foto/kuta/ulwuwatu.jpg
Bratan Lake Uluwatu Temple Uluwatu Temple


Country : Indonesia
Capital : Denpasar
Governor : I Made Mangku Pastika
Total Area : 5.780.06 km2 (2.231.69 sq mi)
Total Population : 4.220.000
Density : 730/km2 (1,900/ sq mi)
Etnic Group

: Balinese (89%), Javanese (7%), Baliaga (1%), Madurese (1%)

Religion : Hindu (84,5%), Muslim (13,3%), Christian (1.7%), Buddhist (0.5%)
Languages : Indonesian (Official), Balinese, English
Time Zone : WITA (UTC+08)
Website : Baliprov.go.id

General Information Bali Island


The divided into 8 regencies and 1 city

The province is divided into 8 regencies and 1 city These are:


Historical Population and Religion In Bali

Historical Population and Religion In Bali



Bali is an island and the smallest province of Indonesia, and includes a few smaller neighbouring islands, notably Nusa Penida. It is located at the westernmost end of the Lesser Sunda Islands, between Java to the west and Lombok to the east, and has its capital of Denpasar at the southern part of the island.


With a population of 3,890,757 in the 2010 census,and currently 4.22 million,the island is home to most of Indonesia's Hindu minority. According to the 2010 Census, 84.5% of Bali's population adhered to Balinese Hinduism, 12% to Islam, while most of the remainder followed Christianity. Bali is also the largest tourist destination in the country and is renowned for its highly developed arts, including traditional and modern dance, sculpture, painting, leather, metalworking, and music. A tourist haven for decades, the province has seen a further surge in tourist numbers in recent years.



Environment

Some of the worst erosion has occurred in Lebih Beach, where up to 7 metres of land is lost every year. Decades ago, this beach was used for holy pilgrimages with more than 10,000 people, but they have now moved to Masceti Beach. From ranked third in previous review, in 2010 Bali got score 99.65 of Indonesia's environmental quality index and the highest of all the 33 provinces. The score measured 3 water quality parameters: the level of total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved oxygen (DO) and chemical oxygen demand (COD).

Because of over-exploitation by the tourist industry which converse massive land, 200 out of 400 rivers on the island have dried up and based on research, the southern part of Bali would face a water shortage up to 2,500 litres of clean water per second by 2015. To ease the shortage, the central government plans to build a water catchment and processing facility at Petanu River in Gianyar. The 300 litres capacity of water per second will be channelled to Denpasar, Badung and Gianyar in 2013.


Economy

Three decades ago, the Balinese economy was largely agriculture-based in terms of both output and employment. Tourism is now the largest single industry in terms of income, and as a result, Bali is one of Indonesia's wealthiest regions. About 80% of Bali's economy depends on tourism;[29] Note: non-referenced % in the article: in fact a great number of the population still lives thanks to agriculture although this situation is changing rapidly. By end of June 2011, non-performing loan of all banks in Bali were 2.23%, lower than the average of Indonesian banking industry non-performing loan (about 5%).The economy, however, suffered significantly as a result of the terrorist bombings 2002 and 2005. The tourism industry has since recovered from these events.


Agriculture

Although tourism produces the GDP's largest output, agriculture is still the island's biggest employer most notably rice cultivation. Crops grown in smaller amounts include fruit, vegetables, Coffea arabica and other cash and subsistence crops. Fishing also provides a significant number of jobs. Bali is also famous for its artisans who produce a vast array of handicrafts, including batik and ikat cloth and clothing, wooden carvings, stone carvings, painted art and silverware. Notably, individual villages typically adopt a single product, such as wind chimes or wooden furniture.


The Arabica coffee production region is the highland region of Kintamani near Mount Batur. Generally, Balinese coffee is processed using the wet method. This results in a sweet, soft coffee with good consistency. Typical flavours include lemon and other citrus notes.[32] Many coffee farmers in Kintamani are members of a traditional farming system called Subak Abian, which is based on the Hindu philosophy of "Tri Hita Karana". According to this philosophy, the three causes of happiness are good relations with God, other people and the environment. The Subak Abian system is ideally suited to the production of fair trade and organic coffee production. Arabica coffee from Kintamani is the first product in Indonesia to request a Geographical Indication.

 

Demographics

The population of Bali was 3,890,757 as of the 2010 Census. There are an estimated 30,000 expatriates living in Bali.


Ethnic origins

A DNA study in 2005 by Karafet et al. found that 12% of Balinese Y-chromosomes are of likely Indian origin, while 84% are of likely Austronesian origin, and 2% of likely Melanesian origin. The study does not correlate the DNA samples to the Balinese caste system.


Caste system - Balinese caste system

Bali has a caste system based on the Indian Hindu model, with four castes:

- Shudras peasants constituting close to 93% of Bali's population.
- Wesias (Vaishyas) the caste of merchants and administrative officials
- Ksatrias (Kshatriyas) the kingly and warrior caste
- Brahmins holy men and priests

Language

Balinese and Indonesian are the most widely spoken languages in Bali, and the vast majority of Balinese people are bilingual or trilingual. The most common spoken language around the tourist areas is Indonesian, as many people in the tourist sector are not solely Balinese, but migrants from Java, Lombok, Sumatra, and other parts of Indonesia. There are several indigenous Balinese languages, but most Balinese can also use the most widely spoken option: modern common Balinese. The usage of different Balinese languages was traditionally determined by the Balinese caste system and by clan membership, but this tradition is diminishing. Kawi and Sanskrit are also commonly used by some Hindu priests in Bali, for Hinduism literature was mostly written in Sanskrit.


English is a common third language (and the primary foreign language) of many Balinese, owing to the requirements of the tourism industry. Other foreign languages, such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean, French or German are often used in multilingual signs for foreign tourists.